An Introduction to the Old Testament: Sacred Texts and Imperial Contexts of the Hebrew Bible
$50.00
Offering readers a balanced and informative guide to the forces that shaped the Old Testament and methods for study of it, this comprehensive text explores the emergence of the Hebrew Bible in the broader context of world history. It particularly focuses on the way the Hebrew Bible was shaped by its interaction with ancient empires, empowering students with a richer understanding of the Old Testament.

In charting the development and impact of the work that forms the core of Judeo-Christian belief, the author examines how these early stories were variously shaped by contact with the Mesopotamian and Egyptian, Assyrian, Babylonian, Persian, and Hellenistic empires. He explores the historical context of the varied readings of the Old Testament, revealing how the Bible came to be interpreted by Jewish, Christian, and Muslim faiths.

This introductory text engages students by placing the development and reception of biblical texts in their historical context – enabling them to explore the formation of the Hebrew Bible and also its subsequent interpretation. Numerous reader-friendly features are incorporated throughout, including study questions, review sections, bibliographies, timelines, and illustrations and photos.

From the Back Cover

Offering readers a balanced and informative guide to the forces that shaped the Old Testament and methods for study of it, this comprehensive text explores the emergence of the Hebrew Bible in the broader context of world history. It particularly focuses on the way the Hebrew Bible was shaped by its interaction with ancient empires, empowering students with a richer understanding of the Old Testament.

In charting the development and impact of the work that forms the core of Judeo-Christian belief, the author examines how these early stories were variously shaped by contact with the Mesopotamian and Egyptian, Assyrian, Babylonian, Persian, and Hellenistic empires. He explores the historical context of the varied readings of the Old Testament, revealing how the Bible came to be interpreted by Jewish, Christian, and Muslim faiths.

This introductory text engages students by placing the development and reception of biblical texts in their historical context - enabling them to explore the formation of the Hebrew Bible and also its subsequent interpretation. Numerous reader-friendly features are incorporated throughout, including study questions, review sections, bibliographies, timelines, and illustrations and photos.

David M. Carr is Professor of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible at Union Theological Seminary in New York. Professor Carr's book-length publications include From D to Q: A Study of Early Jewish Interpretations of Solomon's Dream at Gibeon (1991); Reading the Fractures of Genesis: Historical and Literary Approaches (1996); The Erotic Word: Sexuality, Spirituality and the Bible (2003); and Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of  Scripture and Literature (2005).